Upcoming Lecture Series...

2pm - 4pm Sunday, 30th July 2017

Held in our A20 Dr Cumpston function hall.

 

·  Dementia and other brain disorders: impact on individuals, family and carers: Sid Williams

·  Antipodean perspectives of shell shock in the Great War: Paul Lancaster

Dementia and other brain disorders: impact on individuals, family and carers

The clinical and human significance of some behaviours and experiences associated with brain pathology will be discussed. This will include comments on: stress for family carers; family carer responses; boundary issues for carers; and striking a balance between over and underestimating skills and knowledge retained by a person with dementia. 

 

Sid Williams is a 1966 graduate and previous Associate Professor at Sydney Medical School. He has worked for over 40 years with and for people with dementia. He has been a pioneer in providing and developing services and education for those experiencing dementia, their families, their carers, clinical  and  professional workers involved in assessment and care. His book: Your Brain in Sickness and in Health. The experience of dementia and other brain disorders was published earlier this year.

Presentation: Sid will discuss the clinical and human significance of some behaviours and experiences associated with brain pathology. The discussion will include  comments on: stress for family carers; family carer responses; boundary issues for carers; and striking a balance between over and underestimating skills and knowledge retained by a person with dementia. 

Antipodean perspectives of shell shock in the Great War

In an era when neurology and psychiatry were not yet well established as medical specialties, often confusing terms were used to describe what became widely known as shell shock. Two Australian doctors, and another who later became a medical academic in New Zealand, made significant contributions to a condition whose diagnosis, causes and treatment were often mired in controversy.

Alfred Walter Campbell practised as Australia's first neurologist. He served for a year in Cairo, caring for soldiers transported from Gallipoli, and then published on shell shock.

Grafton Elliot Smith graduated from Sydney Medical School in 1893, was appointed Professor of Anatomy in Cairo, then moved to Manchester, achieving eminence especially as a neuroanatomist. He became interested in shell shock and, consistent with his pre-war views on mental health, published his research based on care of soldiers who had returned from the Western Front to a Military Hospital in England.

Dudley William Carmalt Jones published on his experiences serving as physician on various battlefields of the Western Front. He was subsequently appointed to Otago Medical School in 1920.

They brought refreshing clarity to our understanding of the likely causes and care of those afflicted by this complex condition of shell shock. They recommended treatment in a special hospital or suitably staffed general hospital.

Paul Lancaster initially trained as a paediatrician, then in public health, and was the founding Director of the National Perinatal Statistics Unit at the University of Sydney. In recent years he has conducted research on the doctors and medical students from Sydney Medical School who served in the Great War. He is also researching residents from Pyrmont and Ultimo who served in that war. As a member of the Quarantine Station Community Committee, he organises the Quarantine Station Lecture Series.

To book your place, contact us on 02 9466 1551 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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Lecture Series: Dementia & Shell Shock